51ӰԺ

The University of Pittsburgh's Daily Student Newspaper

51ӰԺ

The University of Pittsburgh's Daily Student Newspaper

51ӰԺ

The University of Pittsburgh's Daily Student Newspaper

51ӰԺ

Join our newsletter

Get Pitt and Oakland news in your inbox, three times a week.

Opinion | Believe victims even if you don’t like them
Opinion | Believe victims even if you don’t like them
By Delaney Rauscher Adams, Staff Columnist • July 12, 2024
Opinion | Women pop stars and the pressure to evolve
By Livia LaMarca, Assistant 51ӰԺ Editor • July 10, 2024

Join our newsletter

Get Pitt and Oakland news in your inbox, three times a week.

Opinion | Believe victims even if you don’t like them
Opinion | Believe victims even if you don’t like them
By Delaney Rauscher Adams, Staff Columnist • July 12, 2024
Opinion | Women pop stars and the pressure to evolve
By Livia LaMarca, Assistant 51ӰԺ Editor • July 10, 2024

Students share their thoughts on Easter travel

Students+share+their+thoughts+on+Easter+travel
Thalia Sifnakis | Senior Staff Illustrator

Many students travel throughout the school year. Given the timing of Easter, weeks after spring break, students had to weigh their options when deciding whether to go home for the holiday. 

A spokesperson for the university said that although Pitt does not have off for any religious holidays in the spring, students are allowed to and encouraged to ask for accommodations from their professors. 

Students who may have a test or a project deadline during a religious observance are encouraged to request an accommodation or alternative testing arrangement,” the spokesperson said. “Departments are encouraged not to hold staff meetings during religious holidays and to offer flexible work arrangements for employees who need to attend services. Students may request absence from class because of religious observance.”

For those observing Easter, this dichotomy is quite different, and with finals upcoming, class attendance is more important than ever. 

Kaitlyn Siek, an undeclared first-year, is an out-of-state student from New Jersey who decided to go home for the weekend. Although it’s a short flight, Seik said it was expensive to travel both ways, and she doesn’t enjoy traveling on weekends. 

“The only reason it’s OK for me to do so is because the flight is about an hour,” Siek said. “Say you live in California, and the flight is six hours — it would take almost an entire day to travel there and back. I have to leave at 5:00 a.m. on Saturday to catch my flight.”

Siek wishes that Pitt would give students off for either the Friday before Easter, or the Monday after, known as , respectively.

“If I had one more day to travel, it would be so much easier,” Siek said.

Siek concluded that the rapid travel is worth seeing her family and her new puppies even for just a couple of days, even though she had to get back for classes on Monday.

Siek made it a point to not miss any class time in the midst of her travels and thinks that a religious exemption does not do as much benefit to students as it seems, especially with finals coming up.

“They say religious exemption, but you are still missing what is being taught,” Siek said. “It’s not about the attendance to me, it’s about what we are learning.”

Catholic Newman Center Service Coordinator and Pittsburgh native Andrew Freedy, an undeclared first-year, discussed how important the holiday is for him and his family.

“This is the biggest holiday for Catholics,” Freedy said. “This is a huge thing in my family … I know this is very similar for all Catholics.”

Though Freedy said having off on Good Friday before Easter could benefit students, he doesn’t think it’s necessary. Undeclared first-year student Spencer Greene will be traveling home for the holiday as well but agrees with Freedy. 

For Greene, whose family resides in Oil City, Pennsylvania, the two-hour drive is not a significant hassle. Greene said it’s important to him to go home and see his family for Easter. 

“Easter to me is celebrating family as a whole,” Greene said. “I see holidays as coming together as a family, and that is how I celebrate it.”

About the Contributor
Aidan Kasner, Staff Writer
Aidan Kasner is a second-year student studying Communication and Psychology.